The Clear Mirror: A Chronicle of the Japanese Court during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333)

The Clear Mirror: A Chronicle of the Japanese Court during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333)

The Clear Mirror: A Chronicle of the Japanese Court during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333)

The Clear Mirror: A Chronicle of the Japanese Court during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333)

Synopsis

Translated by George Perkins, with a full critical apparatus, this work focuses on a medieval history of Japan. A glossary identifies people and places mentioned in the text, and an appendix discusses details concerning the work's authorship.

Excerpt

The translation is from the Gakushūin University Library text edited by Tokieda Motoki and Kidō Saizō in NKBT, which contains many helpful notes. Inoue Muneo Masukagami also proved extremely helpful in translating difficult passages and preparing notes. To avoid excessive annotation, names of personalities and places are identified in the glossary. As a rule, personalities are listed, both in the text and in the glossary, by first name; posthumous names of emperors and in several cases in names of imperial ladies are used for convenience. I have frequently abbreviated or deleted titles and offices, substituting the first name of the individual. The result is perhaps more clarity in the English than in the original, but the practice seemed justified by the excessively cumbersome nature of translated court titles. I have tried to leave titles intact in passages where they are relevant to the content, adding the first name of the individual where necessary for clarity. I have followed McCullough and McCullough (1980) in translating titles and offices, as well as clothing items and colors. I have elected not to include detailed notes on either; interested readers may consult the work above. Ages in the text follow the Japanese manner unless otherwise specified; dates in other sections are calculated in the Western manner.

I am particularly indebted to Professor Helen McCullough, who has kindly worked my earlier, lengthy introduction into a succinct yet informative discussion of the historical and literary background of the work, and whose extensive editing work on the text of my translation has resulted in many stylistic improvements without departing from the spirit of the original translation. I am also appreciative of Professors William McCullough, Makoto Ueda, and Susan Matisoff for many helpful suggestions during my initial study of Masukagami for the Ph.D. dissertation. I am, of course, solely responsible for any flaws in the final product.

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