Global Public Policy: Governing without Government?

Global Public Policy: Governing without Government?

Global Public Policy: Governing without Government?

Global Public Policy: Governing without Government?

Synopsis

"In this book, Wolfgang Reinicke provides an in-depth analysis of economic globalization and examines its implications for public policy. Using three studies - the need for global supervision of banking and finance; efforts to control money laundering, the engine of global criminal networks; and the management of dual-use technology transfer after the cold war - the book shows how the principles of global public policy have the potential to improve the capacities of governments and international organizations to deal with the challenges of the 21st century, without having to resort to territorial answers." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

During the last decade, globalization has become a fashionable term among policymakers and academics alike. It is repeatedly invoked to legitimize a policy decision, promote a policy prescription, or explain a policy outcome. No doubt it will occupy the attention of policymakers well into the next century. Yet despite the term's frequent use, little systematic analysis has been done on the sources, measurement, and implications of globalization for public policy.

In this book, Wolfgang H. Reinicke, until recently a fellow at Brookings, currently a nonresident senior fellow in the Brookings Foreign Policy Studies program and senior economist in the World Bank's Corporate Strategy Group, analyzes economic globalization and examines its implications for public policy. Although national responses, as suggested on both ends of the political spectrum in the United States and elsewhere, are flawed, they have grown in popularity and threaten to infiltrate mainstream policy discourse. To avoid a backlash against globalization when responding to the economic, social, and even security challenges that it inevitably involves, public policy--including its principles, instruments, and institutions--will have to undergo a fundamental reconstruction. Global public policy--not world government, but a network of public, private, nongovernmental, national, regional, and international organizations--provides an alternative and promising framework.

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