Beggar on Horseback, a Play in Two Parts

Beggar on Horseback, a Play in Two Parts

Beggar on Horseback, a Play in Two Parts

Beggar on Horseback, a Play in Two Parts

Excerpt

Some of us have been made a trifle ill by a surfeit of those magazines which nourish a hungry multitude with helpful articles on how unshod newsboys become corporation presidents. We have been further wearied by the more characteristic American comedies which regard evening clothes and abrupt wealth as quite essential parts of a happy ending. It is to please us, therefore, that the Messrs. Kaufman and Connelly have written this gay, engaging and derisive comedy called "Beggar on Horseback."

They offer it merely as a relieving antidote to the worship of material prosperity. It is a play written in the distaste that can be inspired by the viewpoint, the complacency and the very idiom of Rotarian America. It is a small and facetious disturbance in the rear of the Church of the Gospel of Success. When staged in the very capital of the Land of Go-Getters, its gesture is as defiant as that made on a not dissimilar occasion by one Barbara Frietchie.

Down in Washington sits a wise doctor who would tell them that they are having a bout with nothing less formidable than nature itself, that they . . .

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