The Four Fears

The Four Fears

The Four Fears

The Four Fears

Excerpt

Just about the time this book was begun, one of our well- known columnists declared that the public's taste for reading about peace was a sign of war weariness and a means of running away from the serious business of fighting and working to win. Instead of facing "the fact that we probably have years of fighting ahead of us," he wrote, people "want to think of the war as over and discuss beautiful dreams about helicopters in every backyard."

The long fight seems to me almost certain. The present war has already lasted longer than that of 1914-18, and I see no reason to suppose it will end soon. I disagree, however, with the journalist's view of postwar talk. You may as well argue that a man must not think of rebuilding his house while trying to put out the fire burning up his present one. If he could not look ahead with some hope, some dream of an even better house, he could have no heart to put out any fires at all. Offering him that hope is not the same thing as promising him a helicopter in his backyard. Anyone who imagines that the world after this war is going to be a rosy paradise of plastic magic and blueberry pies is fooling himself. Anyone who makes such promises had better be watched carefully. He is out for some scheme of his own.

The world is going to be what it has always been, a world . . .

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