Art, the Critics, and You

Art, the Critics, and You

Art, the Critics, and You

Art, the Critics, and You

Excerpt

He artist and the philosopher are two men regarded by the general public with a certain bewilderment, compounded of respect and mistrust, mild scorn and envy, impatience and wonder. The philosopher is popularly conceived as an impractical being, so deeply plunged in abstract thought that he does not even see where he walks and cannot recognize his wife when he meets her at the train unless he takes along her photograph. His words, moreover, are often irritatingly obscure; and this has moved one of philosophy's own devotees to describe it facetiously as "the systematic abuse of an elaborate technical terminology invented especially for the purpose." Yet so important have the writings of some philosophers been considered that study of them has persisted through century after century; and some philosophical ideas have been recognized as potentially so dynamic that more than one philosopher has had to pay for expressing them with his liberty or even his life.

The artist is commonly thought of as perhaps less dangerous but no less queer. He is pictured as a long-haired creature who wears odd clothes, whose habitat is a garret, and who lives an ill-regulated . . .

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