The Pattern of Competition

The Pattern of Competition

The Pattern of Competition

The Pattern of Competition

Excerpt

With the passage of time, great and significant changes have occurred in the political and economic arrangements of mankind. Social relationships have become more complex. In part, because of this complexity, careful work in the social sciences has made it increasingly necessary for scholars to interest themselves in minutiae. Monographs of scholarly merit but of limited social significance have characterized the literature. In economics, especially, there appears to be need for a convenient means of synthesis.

While social relationships have become more complex, the rate at which they are changing has accelerated. The world at large appears to be in a state of rapid transition, and economic institutions are no exception to this sweeping movement. No one can hope to understand the significance of change in its entirety; but intelligent minds aspire to see large situations as a whole and in relation to each other. In the words of William Fielding Ogburn and Alexander Goldenweiser (The Social Sciences and Their Interrelations):

The increasing specialization in the social sciences has been accompanied by greater ignorance as well as by greater knowledge. This handicap has been especially felt because the rapidity of social change in recent years has made it difficult for branches of knowledge in the social sciences to remain within the bounds prescribed under earlier situations. Furthermore, with the rise of the modern emphasis on social research, it has been found that many problems lie in several different fields and that their solution demands methods from the various social sciences. The increasing specialization also . . .

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