Economics of Transportation

Economics of Transportation

Economics of Transportation

Economics of Transportation

Excerpt

The first edition of Economics of Transportation appeared in 1935; the first revision in 1938; and the third edition in 1947. The course of events in this dynamic and ever-changing segment of the economy makes another revision of the book necessary if it is to serve its greatest usefulness.

After considering various plans for changing the organization of the book, it was decided to retain essentially the organization of the earlier editions, and thereby preserve the characteristics that have come to be associated with the book, rather than to produce a different book under the title of the old. Yet, within this original framework, the text has been completely revised and extensively rewritten; recent developments have been incorporated, and factual material has been brought up to date throughout. In revising, particular attention has been paid to comments from the users of the previous editions in an effort to improve the text for classroom use.

A new chapter has been added early in the volume to provide an over-all look at the transportation system, to indicate the relative importance of the various modes of transport, and to note significant differences in their organization and call attention to differences in their development in point of time. A chapter on highways and highway finance has been added. The material on highway transport and air transport, and their regulation, has been expanded somewhat because of new developments in those fields. The material relating to transport co-ordination and intercarrier relations has been expanded also. In order to make room for new material without unduly lengthening the volume, an effort has been made to condense other portions of the volume and, at the same time, to take note of new developments, additional legislation, and significant developments in regulatory policy. There has also been a simplification of the treatment of some subjects and the elimination of some detail.

Notwithstanding these efforts, some teachers using this volume as a text may desire to omit some chapters. Each instructor should do this on the basis of his course objectives, his special interests and training, and the educational background of his students.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.