Dictionary of Bio-Chemistry and Related Subjects

Dictionary of Bio-Chemistry and Related Subjects

Dictionary of Bio-Chemistry and Related Subjects

Dictionary of Bio-Chemistry and Related Subjects

Excerpt

The Dictionary of Biochemistry is a pioneering effort in an entirely new field. There have been no previous dictionaries of this kind. Furthermore, the concept of a "dictionary" has been changing from that of a mere alphabetical glossary to something resembling an encyclopedia. At least a dozen of conflicting possibilities of offerded themselves at the planning of this volume, each of which was both enthusiastically supported and violently attacked by people wih strong preferences and aversions. There was only one thing left to do and that was to try to reconcile seeming contradictions and to combine as many features as possible. All of this had to be done within serious limitations of space and serious limitations of cooperation due to the outbreak of the war. Consequently, this effort breaks ground in many directions. The dictionary contains a great deal of glossary material and also a great deal of fairly lengthy authoritative discussion. It tries to maintain a balance between obsolescent, established and newly explored material. It is designed for readers of biochemical literature whio might want the definitions of term used more than a decade ago as well as of terms just coined. There was no intention of replacing text-books or abstract or review journals, except insofar as certain items are greatly neglected or are not easily available. This will account for what might appear as too liberal an allowance for articles on teeth, hair, biochemistry of Phychiatry, phosphate bond energy, bacteriophage, etc., and a corresponding brevity on topics found in every text. Articles, like Prof. Witzemann's unified discussion of carbohydrate and fat metabolism, also represent an effort at something different, highly synthetic in the midst of the atomism of a dictionary.

It is highly fitting that a scientific dictionary should itself be experimental. In view of this we earnestly request suggestions from workers in the field, be they experts or students, and from workers from neighboring fields who might want to recieve or give information from their point of view. Our criteria must change with growing experience in the actual practical use of the dictionary.

We take this occasion to thank the collaborators, whose names are listed separately; to acknowledge the fıne courtesy of Dr. R. E. Gruber, Vice-Pres. of Merck & Co., who granted permission to select data from The Merck Index (Fifth Ed.) and The Merck Manual (Seventh Ed.), and of the Science Press and Chas. C. Thomas, Publisher, who allowed the reprinting of article and text materials; and to express appreciation of the technical advice of Dr. Dagobert D. Runes.

WILLIAM MARIAS MALISOFF.

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