Background for Queen Anne

Background for Queen Anne

Background for Queen Anne

Background for Queen Anne

Excerpt

Two hundred years from now, the reader who is interested in the early twentieth century will have no difficulty in finding out all that he wants to know about George V, Earl Haig, Colonel Lawrence, and Mr. Bernard Shaw. History can be trusted to look after her own; and Mr. Shaw--admittedly with excellent material to work upon--has taken good care that he shall not be forgotten. But if the curious reader meets which the name of Horatio Bottomley, or Amy Johnson, or George Robey, or if he comes across a reference to Buchmanism or Aston Villa, he will no doubt experience some difficulty in finding out who or what they were, and why they were so celebrated in their own day. Yet if he wants to understand the early twentieth century, and to know what men and women were really like in that period, he is much more likely to get the right answer by rediscovering the Bottomleys and the Robeys than by fastening his attention exclusively upon their more famous contemporaries.

Of the seven characters about whom I have written in this book, four, I imagine, are quite unknown even to those who are fairly familiar with the eighteenth century. They turned up when I was looking for other things. Richard Burridge, for instance, I first came across when I was reading through Mist Weekly Journal . . .

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