The Development of Dominion Status, 1900-1936

The Development of Dominion Status, 1900-1936

The Development of Dominion Status, 1900-1936

The Development of Dominion Status, 1900-1936

Excerpt

That peculiar political condition which is now called Dominion status has had a long and varied history; but no part of its development has been so full of constitutional interest as the last twenty years. Yet those who have lived through this period are frequently very much at loss to recall the exact sequence of events and the manner in which Dominion autonomy has proceeded step by step to its present position. This book is an attempt to give the general reader a concise account of what Dominion status means, and how it has grown out of the political experience of the immediate past. To accomplish this, the book is arranged in two parts: first, a narrative of the development of Dominion status since 1900; and second, a very generous selection from the essential contemporary documents by means of which the reader may, if he so desires, study this development first-hand. These documents have not been limited to official reports and bluebooks (which are naturally indispensable in dealing with such a topic), but they also include other material from newspapers and periodicals, which supplement the formal papers and frequently bear additional information which is unobtainable elsewhere. The two parts have been linked together by footnotes and cross-references.

I wish to thank the newspapers, periodicals, and authors for their generous permission to reprint their articles, which have added materially to the value and interest of the book. More explicit acknowledgement is contained in the text at the head of each extract.

I am also deeply indebted to all those who have helped me and have in many instances read over large parts of the manuscript. I wish to mention especially Mr. John W. Dafoe of the Manitoba Free Press, whose knowledge of this part of Dominion constitutional history is unrivalled and whose advice and criticism have been constantly at my disposal. Sir Robert Borden, Dr. Walter C. Murray, Hon. Norman McL. Rogers, Mr. John E. Read, Professor Frank H. Underhill, and Professor Robert A. MacKay-- all have given generously of their time and knowledge and have made many valuable suggestions. Finally, I must thank . . .

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