Hawthorne and His Circle

Hawthorne and His Circle

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Hawthorne and His Circle

Hawthorne and His Circle

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Inheritance of friendships -- Gracious giants -- My own good fortune -- My father the central figure -- What did his gift to me cost him? -- A revelation in Colorado -- Privileges make difficulties -- Lights and shadows of memory -- An informal narrative -- Contrast between my father's life and mine.

THE best use we can make of good fortune is to share it with our fellows. Those to whom good things come by way of inheritance, however, are often among the latest to comprehend their own advantage; they suppose it to be the common condition. And no doubt I had nearly arrived at man's estate before it occurred to me that the lines of few fishers of men were cast in places so pleasant as mine. I was the son of a man of high desert, who had such friends as he deserved; and these companions and admirers of his gave to me in the beginning of my days a kindly welcome and encouragement generated from their affection and reverence for him. Without doing a stroke of work for it, I found myself early in the enjoyment of a principality of good will and fellowship -- a species of freemasonry, I might call it, though the secret was patent enough . . .

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