A History of Later Greek Literature from the Death of Alexander in 323 B.C. to the Death of Justinian in 565 A.D

A History of Later Greek Literature from the Death of Alexander in 323 B.C. to the Death of Justinian in 565 A.D

A History of Later Greek Literature from the Death of Alexander in 323 B.C. to the Death of Justinian in 565 A.D

A History of Later Greek Literature from the Death of Alexander in 323 B.C. to the Death of Justinian in 565 A.D

Excerpt

The insistence of classical scholars in concentrating their attention on two remote periods of Greek and Latin literature has led the ignorant to call both languages 'dead.' The word is not true of either, and even if Latin now is sleeping, it is still the language of the Church. As for Greek, it has an unbroken history of some thirty centuries, which may be divided into three periods. The first of these extends from Homer to Aristotle, the third from the sixth century A.D., until our own days. Of the second period, which includes the nine centuries from the death of Alexander in 323 B.C., to the death of Justinian in A.D. 565, when the Greeks were acting as teachers to the civilized world, this book attempts to give an account. I believe that there is no continuous history of this kind in English, but my task has been lightened by the recent labours of many scholars. I desire to express my special obligations to the New Chapters in Greek Literature by J. A. Powell and E. A. Barber, to the translation of Lucian by H. W. and F. G. Fowler, to Sir R. W. Livingstone's Mission of Greece, and above all to the invaluable Loeb Library, which has rendered so many ancient authors easily accessible for the first time to the English public. To its editors and to the Syndics of the Clarendon Press I tender here my thanks.

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