America in the World Today: A Lecture Delivered at the University of Minnesota, Williams Arena, on January 27, 1957

America in the World Today: A Lecture Delivered at the University of Minnesota, Williams Arena, on January 27, 1957

America in the World Today: A Lecture Delivered at the University of Minnesota, Williams Arena, on January 27, 1957

America in the World Today: A Lecture Delivered at the University of Minnesota, Williams Arena, on January 27, 1957

Excerpt

The size of this great audience is the measure of your respect for our distinguished speaker, and no doubt it is also an indication of your concern about the rapid pace and evolution of world events that affect our welfare and security. We are all looking for explanations that throw light on happenings that involve us as a people, and we are searching for foreign policy solutions that are in keeping with our Western heritage and traditional freedoms.

Your attendance in such large numbers at this lecture in the Gideon D. Seymour Memorial Series is a recognition of our guest's great contribution to the clarification of public thinking. Mr. Lippmann's critical insight, imaginativeness, and common sense in his approach to public questions are well understood. His defense of the political values in American life requires no elaboration here. Not long ago a faculty man at Yale University thus characterized our speaker: "Mr. Lippmann is one of the more influential and honorable guardians of the contemporary American conscience."

It is especially fitting that Mr. Lippmann, who has written so regularly and significantly for the press, should appear in the lecture series honoring Gideon Seymour. Mr. Seymour's editorial window looked out on Minnesota and Midwest events, but his own experience abroad convinced him that his newspapers must seek the greater enlightenment of readers on the import of world affairs, one of the evidences of his desire to contribute to the good of this community.

When Mr. Lippmann left his editorial window on the fighting New York World, after serving as editorial writer and editor, he joined the New York Herald Tribune with the understanding that he should enjoy complete freedom of expression. Since a signed editorial commentary of the type proposed was something of an . . .

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