The Transformation of Nature in Art

The Transformation of Nature in Art

The Transformation of Nature in Art

The Transformation of Nature in Art

Excerpt

Which things also we speak, not in the words which man's wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth.

Corinthians , I, 2, 13.

THE terms parokṣa and pratyakṣa are used in contrasted senses. The purely grammatical distinction of parokṣa and pratyakṣa need not detain us: a stanza referring to an Angel (deva), if voiced in the third person, is said to be parokṣa, "indirect," or if addressed immediately in the seccond person, pratyakṣa, "direct," Nirukta, VII , 1. What concerns us more is the distinction of the parokṣa as proper to the Angels (adhidaivata), who are accordingly described as parokṣa-priya, "fond of" the symbolic, from the pratyakṣa as proper to man (mānuṣa) as individual (adhyātma), who is evidently pratyakṣa-priya, "fond of" the obvious, though this is not explicitly stated.

In Jaim. Up. Br., I , 20, Ait. Br., III , 33 and VIII, 30, Ś. Br., VI , 1, 1, 2 and 11 and XIV, I, 1, 13, Br. Up., IV , 2, 2, and Ait. Up., III , 14, examples are given as follows (the parokṣa designations being followed in each case by the pratyakṣa designations printed in italics): antarikṣa, antaryakṣa; mānuṣa, māduṣa; nyagrodha, nyagroha; Indra, indha, idandra; Agni, agri; aśva, aśru. To these may be added from passages cited below: Ahi Budhnya, Agni Gārhapatya . . .

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