Jonathan Edwards: The Fiery Puritan

Jonathan Edwards: The Fiery Puritan

Jonathan Edwards: The Fiery Puritan

Jonathan Edwards: The Fiery Puritan

Excerpt

It was 1741. A corpulent German, with a corpulent German mistress, was king of England, to maintain the rights of property and keep out the popish pretender; the whig lords ruled the kingdom, and Sir Robert Walpole had just been driven from office; William Pitt was a young politician who seemed to be using patriotism as a cloak for private ambition; there was a maritime war with Spain, which was grossly mismanaged. The king of France, young and popular, was expected to rival the exploits of his predecessor; the Pompadour and the Parc aux Cerfs, the breadriots, the bankruptcy, and the revolution were all in the future; the rights of man were a myth, and democracy not even a dream. A young fop, who had become king of Prussia, had used his father's grenadiers to stealSilesia from the heiress of the Hapsburgs, and was defending it furiously against the Austrian field-marshals; the war threatened to involve England and France.

Locke, with his theory that all ideas were acquired from sensation, was the reigning philosopher; and Newton's vision of a law-ordered universe had permeated the intellectual consciousness of Europe; Halley was astronomer . . .

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