Ancient Education and Its Meaning to Us

Ancient Education and Its Meaning to Us

Ancient Education and Its Meaning to Us

Ancient Education and Its Meaning to Us

Excerpt

What is the true object of education? Should the educator aim at training the largest possible number of individuals to be of the greatest possible service to the State, up to the limit of the capability of each, or should he rather try to give each one an opportunity to develop fully the best qualities which he possesses, regardless of whether this method of training may or may not seem to be of immediate practical use either to the person or to the community? The question, in most ages and most countries, does not admit of a simple answer. It came nearest to being answered in Sparta, which of all nations known to history paid least attention to the individual as such, and in Republican Rome, which, though not so rigid as Sparta, regarded education as concerned mainly with the production of useful citizens.

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