America's Dilemma in the Far East

America's Dilemma in the Far East

America's Dilemma in the Far East

America's Dilemma in the Far East

Excerpt

As the war nears its concluding phases, the United States has already entered on a period in which it must define and execute Far Eastern policies that will have a significant influence for decades to come. That these policies must be concerted policies, worked out and applied in agreement with the other United Nations, does not greatly detract from the large measure of responsibility that will rest with this country in establishing and supporting the terms of peace in the Pacific. On every segment of the circle that is closing in on Japan, American armed forces, equipment and personnel are committed in great strength. This commitment, which will steadily increase until the final battles are won, means that the United States is also charged with participation in the framing of a settlement. It must be prepared to match the military victory with a program designed to bulwark peace by helping the Far Eastern peoples to move forward into a new era of security and freedom. The responsibility will not be discharged in the terms of a peace document. It is a continuing one, requiring that a complex set of political and economic relationships be conducted over a long period of years in accordance with sound and liberal policies.

Many of the old guideposts of American policy, noted in the early chapters of this book will no longer apply in the postwar Far East. Others will have to be revised to accord with the changes that take place in the conditions and status of Japan, China, and the countries of Southeast Asia. No blueprints sketched by the United States or other outside powers can be expected to provide answers to problems that must in the last analysis be solved by the Far Eastern peoples themselves. The success of American policy may perhaps be best gauged by the extent to which it enables the forward looking representatives of these peoples to assume control of their countries' destinies. Machinery for international security can supply the framework of a peace structure. But this structure will live and grow in the western Pacific only as the area of true political and economic democracy broadens within Japan, China, the Philippines, and other Far Eastern countries. Their respective national policies . . .

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