Our Face from Fish to Man: A Portrait Gallery of Our Ancient Ancestors and Kinsfolk Together with a Concise History of Our Best Features

Our Face from Fish to Man: A Portrait Gallery of Our Ancient Ancestors and Kinsfolk Together with a Concise History of Our Best Features

Our Face from Fish to Man: A Portrait Gallery of Our Ancient Ancestors and Kinsfolk Together with a Concise History of Our Best Features

Our Face from Fish to Man: A Portrait Gallery of Our Ancient Ancestors and Kinsfolk Together with a Concise History of Our Best Features

Excerpt

According to popular standards of civilized peoples, men of one's own race and tongue were called "men," "warriors," "heroes," but people of other races were "barbarians," "unholy ones," "foreign devils." The founder of one's own clan was often considered to be the son of a deity, while the barbarians were the descendants of monkeys or other wild animals. Or the first man was created perfect, in the image of God. One's own family, of course, was fairly true to type but sin had played havoc with the features of other races. To believe all this was comforting to one's own "face" in a world where the inferiority complex occasionally haunted even kings.

Imagine then the effect of telling one-hundredpercent Americans that they are not the descendants of the god-like Adam but are sons and daughters of Dryopithecus, or of some nearly allied genus of anthropoid apes that lived in the Miocene . . .

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