AFL-CIO, Labor United

AFL-CIO, Labor United

AFL-CIO, Labor United

AFL-CIO, Labor United

Excerpt

I am deeply grateful to a number of my colleagues who collaborated with me in the writing of this book. The contributions of my associates, Henry C. Fleisher, Jack Barbash, David E. Feller, Thomas E. Harris, and Albert Zack, are manifold. In a very real sense they are the book's joint authors, but in acknowledging their collaboration, I must immediately add that I alone am responsible for the views expressed and conclusions drawn, and for whatever the shortcomings of the book may be.

An additional caveat is also necessary. This book is not an official chronology of the road to labor unity; nor is it an official interpretation of the merger agreement and constitution of the AFL-CIO. True, as general counsel of the CIO, I participated in the unity meetings of recent years and in the drafting of the basic documents. I have tried scrupulously, however, to respect the confidential character of the discussions that occurred at the unity meetings and to confine the narrative in the book to matters that are properly of public record. In so far as the basic documents are concerned, they are set forth in the appendix and speak for themselves.

The interpretation of the events resulting in labor unity and of the basic documents is my own, and does not bind the AFL- CIO or the unity negotiators. I think a tribute is in order to the high-mindedness and statesmanlike attitude displayed by these negotiators -- the members of the AFL-CIO committee. They accomplished what is almost unprecedented in the history of social institutions -- they healed a schism and made unity out of division. This group of leaders of labor were directly responsible for the achievement of the AFL-CIO merger. All of them played . . .

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