Beyond Customs: An Educator's Journey

Beyond Customs: An Educator's Journey

Beyond Customs: An Educator's Journey

Beyond Customs: An Educator's Journey

Excerpt

In June 1938 I sailed from Montreal to England. I stood on deck in the early morning and thought how easy it was going to be to come back to the United States. Two years before, I had spent several weeks visiting friends in New York City and the South, and now I had just finished a year as a graduate fellow at Radcliffe. America was like a second home. Of course I would soon be back. No problem.

Well, there were problems: bad problems like Munich and the war and my husband's illness and death; good problems like marriage, work, and family. So it was 29 years later, in March 1967, that I came back to America for the first time. I had been invited to talk to the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) Conference in Dallas on innovations we had been promoting at the University of London Goldsmiths' College Curriculum Laboratory ("the Lab"), of which I was director. There we had been making a total reappraisal of adolescent education, in collaboration with groups of experienced teachers and administrators. It seemed that the policies we had developed had relevance for young people in America, and there was interest also in the fact that in less than two years our courses had led to substantial change in schools.

I enjoyed my visit so much, meeting new friends and old and revisiting places long remembered, that I failed to realize until I was back in England that I had gone into extreme culture-shock. I could not at the time fully analyze my fear and sense of doom. All I could do was to write three long poems about the end of the world; they were called "New King's Road" (which in London leads through . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.