Musical Thought in Britain and Germany during the Early Eighteenth Century

Musical Thought in Britain and Germany during the Early Eighteenth Century

Musical Thought in Britain and Germany during the Early Eighteenth Century

Musical Thought in Britain and Germany during the Early Eighteenth Century

Synopsis

Musical Thought in Britain and Germany During the Early Eighteenth Century discusses important changes in attitudes toward music as seen in the writings of British and German philosophers, journalists, and musicians. Selecting four major aesthetic issues (the affections, imitation of nature, taste, and the imagination), Boomgaarden shows that the continuity of Eighteenth-Century musical thought defies any attempt to place the shift in musical style from Baroque to Classical at 1750--a shift which had actually begun long before. Significant Franciscan poverty. The study is a significant contribution to women's, religious, and art history.

Excerpt

This study examines the musical thought of the eighteenth century from a vantage point different from that taken by most historians up to now, emphasizing musical events and concepts in Britain and Germany, along with the cross-fertilization of ideas which took place between those two countries. While no one can deny the great importance of France in the development of musical thought, British and German intellectual circles never blindly assimilated French ideas. French neoclassicism is not the same as British neoclassicism, and German neoclassicism is something different from both. the authors of the German Aufklärung and the British Enlightenment each sought to create a unique national art, achieved not through slavish imitation of French models, but by creating viable alternatives.

There were, of course, differences between British and German musical thought during the century. This was partly a result of the fact that German writers were usually . . .

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