The March of Fascism

The March of Fascism

The March of Fascism

The March of Fascism

Excerpt

Americans seem intent upon repeating some of the most conspicuous errors of social and economic judgment made in Europe in the past two decades. We find it difficult to imagine that an American Fascism might sometime seem as attractively patriotic a necessity to large groups of our people as the German, Italian, or Austrian brands appeared to those people. We are content to see in the new European system only terror and regimentation, and to allow ourselves the luxury of believing in its imminent collapse. We have failed to explain to ourselves the mystery of its popularity and the mechanics of its success. We have not yet accepted it as a serious contender for power in America.

Although we are unwilling to believe that Fascism could really be made to appear an attractive, popular alternative to a democratic failure here, many of us are nevertheless frightened at the growing imitations of foreign intolerance and unscrupulousness here. We debate police measures, and the advisability of surrendering some of our civil liberties to maintain the rest. We try to exorcise the new evil by the incantation of the bill of rights. We discuss very seriously the possible necessity of destroying Fascism by war abroad before it can spread still further, as if its roots were entirely abroad. Yet our own anxiety has not led us to undertake the job of creating a satisfactory working alternative to Fascism any more than the same anxiety and fear, raised to the pitch of hysteria, did in Europe. We have not yet come to the place . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.