A Communist Party in Action: An Account of the Organization and Operations in France

A Communist Party in Action: An Account of the Organization and Operations in France

A Communist Party in Action: An Account of the Organization and Operations in France

A Communist Party in Action: An Account of the Organization and Operations in France

Excerpt

This book, a somewhat abridged English translation of A. Rossi's Physiologie du Parti Communiste Français, goes to the printer's at a moment when the prevailing mood in the United States is one of ebullient optimism concerning the problems to which its conclusions are relevant.

Informed opinion, official and unofficial, holds that our domestic Communist movement, if indeed it ever constituted a significant threat to the existing social order (the clean bill of health obtained by all but a handful of United States Government employees from the recent loyalty investigation suggests that it never did), certainly constitutes no such threat today--as witness the "failure" of the Wallace movement in the 1948 election, the demonstrated incapacity of the Communist Party to recruit any significant number of Americans as Party members, and, most important of all perhaps, the continuous crystallization of public sentiment against the Communists through the years since the war. Press an exponent of this informed opinion for an explanation of this shift in public sentiment and he will tell you that it is the result of increased public awareness of the connection between the Communist Party and the Soviet Union (against which, as we have at last all admitted to ourselves, we are waging a cold war), or of heightened public understanding of the character and meaning of the Communist movement, both here and abroad. Press him for evidence of that shift of public sentiment and he will point to the mounting penalties, both institutional and social, that are now being visited upon men and women suspected of entertaining Communist views; press him further and he will point out that even the most convinced American disciples of John Stuart Mill now pause, before telling you why the loyalty program in its present form is a betrayal of the democratic faith of our fathers, or why the "hysteria" about Communists on the part of the trustees and regents of our universities should be deplored by all right-minded Americans, to say: "Let me be very clear about one thing: nobody hates Communism more than I do. But . . ." Press . . .

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