Juvenile Delinquency and the Schools

Juvenile Delinquency and the Schools

Juvenile Delinquency and the Schools

Juvenile Delinquency and the Schools

Excerpt

At the meeting of the Board of Directors in February, 1945, Mr. Charters commented on the current emphasis in press reports on the seeming futility of community endeavors throughout the country to solve the problem of juvenile delinquency. It was noted that there were unmistakable signs of growing concern on the part of both public and private agencies that cater to the interests and welfare of youth. In view of the fact that many of the delinquents were enrolled in the schools and many others are still within the age range of compulsory school attendance, the Board concluded that it would be desirable to explore the possibilities of a yearbook dealing with the role of the schools in promoting remedial and preventive measures in relation to delinquent behavior. Mr. Charters was then requested to seek the advice of recognized authorities with respect to the appropriate content of the yearbook and to inquire about professional workers in schools and other social agencies whose services might be enlisted as members of the yearbook committee. The results of these inquiries were reported by Mr. Charters at the ensuing meetings in 1945, and the general plan of the yearbook was formally approved at the meeting of April 28, 1946. The yearbook committee was then selected, with Miss Strang as chairman. Mr. Charters was requested to serve as a member of the committee, representing the Board of Directors.

The problem of juvenile delinquency is viewed in thoroughly normal perspective in the several chapters of this yearbook. The emphasis is placed on the need of adult understanding of the causes of delinquent behavior on the part of children and youth. To this end, the findings of research in both the social and the biological sciences are utilized in discerning analyses of childhood reactions to environmental influences, developmental differences in individual delinquents being appropriately recognized. Consideration is also given to the types of curative and preventive measures that appropriately apply when delinquency is dealt with from the point of view of the needs of children and youth rather than in terms of adult sanctions and authoritative control. The relational responsibilities of the school, the home, and the community are realistically clarified by reference to the outcomes of co-operative experiments in a variety of community settings. Thus, the labors of the yearbook committee and their associated contributors and consultants have . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.