Hellas: Travels in Greece

Hellas: Travels in Greece

Hellas: Travels in Greece

Hellas: Travels in Greece

Excerpt

Georg Brandes has always been controversial; his essays and criticisms have hardly ever approached a subject, a movement, or a person, without having a definite desire to praise or condemn. His advocacy of novorum hominum has rarely been merely academic. And the man's entire career has in consequence been beset with hostilities of every kind, due in many cases to his emphatic espousal of such traits in his successive heroes as may not have received the general approbation.

No doubt Brandes has always leaned toward the classical element in civilization and more or less looked down upon the modern literature that is its offspring. Thus, when comparing Shakespeare's treatment of certain Greek characters in Troilus and Cressida with Homer's treatment of the same figures, Brandes finds himself impelled to declare:

"In the Iliad, these forms represent the outcome of the imagination of the noblest people of the . . .

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