Human Productivity Enhancement: Organizations, Personnel, and Decision Making - Vol. 2

Human Productivity Enhancement: Organizations, Personnel, and Decision Making - Vol. 2

Human Productivity Enhancement: Organizations, Personnel, and Decision Making - Vol. 2

Human Productivity Enhancement: Organizations, Personnel, and Decision Making - Vol. 2

Excerpt

Over the last several years the public has become aware of the importance of increasing human productivity by considering the design of a hardware system from the point of view of the potential user. But the design of a hardware system must be considered within the broader context of the job and the organization, which is a more appropriate framework for research on ways to enhance human productivity. Only in this way will the total system then incorporate the various perspectives offered by manpower and personnel, organizational structure and process, training, and systems design.

In planning new behavioral science research, scientists have an obvious need to know what has been happening in all major areas of relevant research, such as academic, industrial, space, and military research and development. However, in attempting to review the state of the art or to probe topics in depth, scientists frequently find that they do not know where or how to obtain definitive material on major military and government behavioral research findings. This is because only a small fraction of the research is reported in refereed professional journals or presented at meetings of professional societies.

Yet, despite this dearth of available information, the total military and space output of research findings and products is vast. A half-dozen major military behavioral science organizations support the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force; another half-dozen military organizations are involved in administering contract research. (Two major behavioral laboratories support NASA exclusively.) Indeed, the U.S. Department of Defense is the largest employer of research psychologists in the world, with 750 in-house scientists the majority of whom are psychologists. They conduct basic exploratory and advanced research and development on the acquisition, development, training, and utilization of personnel in military systems to improve organizational effectiveness. Annual expenditures of more than $300 million on in-house and contract efforts ensure comprehensive scope of research efforts that exert a major influence on the field of psychology.

Unfortunately, the essence of this research has not undergone sufficient integration to be maximally useful to managers, scientists . . .

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