Faith and Reason

Faith and Reason

Faith and Reason

Faith and Reason

Synopsis

The practice of a religion such as Christianity is normally said to involve faith. But different theologians give different account of faith--some say it is simply a belief that God exists, other say it is trust in God. In this third and final volume of his trilogy on philosophical theology, Swinburne analyzes the purposes for practicing a religion--the attainment of salvation for oneself and the rendering of due worship and obedience to God--and concludes that both trust and belief are necessary for religious faith, but that the belief involved is a fairly weak kind--the belief that a certain creed is more likely than others to be true.

Excerpt

This book is based on the third of my three series of Wilde Lectures, given in the University of Oxford in Hilary Term 1978. (The first two series came to form my book The Existence of God.) I am most grateful to those who elected me to the Wilde Lectureship; and to the President and Fellows of St. John's College, Oxford, for the very generous hospitality which they showed me during the terms in which I delivered the lectures. I am also most grateful to Mrs Yvonne Quirke for her patient typing of various versions of the book.

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