Paddling with the Current: Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Etienne Parent, Liberalism, and Nationalism in Canada

Paddling with the Current: Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Etienne Parent, Liberalism, and Nationalism in Canada

Paddling with the Current: Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Etienne Parent, Liberalism, and Nationalism in Canada

Paddling with the Current: Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Etienne Parent, Liberalism, and Nationalism in Canada

Synopsis

Since his election as Prime Minister in June, 1968, Pierre Elliott Trudeau has dominated Canadian politics and wielded an extraordinary influence-even after his retirement from political life in 1984. Right up to the present day, through his pronouncements and publications, Trudeau continues both to fascinate us and to provoke highly emotional reactions.

Excerpt

Once in power, did Pierre Elliott Trudeau reproduce the same ambiguities we have observed in his representation of French-Canadian nationalist "monolithism"? in order to answer that question, we should first look at Trudeau's definition of a "just society."

The just society

In The Trudeau Years, the former editor of Cité libre gives this definition of the just society:

At a time like this, what attracted me to politics was no longer the desire to fight for liberty, since that battle already belonged to the past. in my mind, the value to put to the fore in the pursuit of a just society was rather equality. Not a Procustian equality, naturally, in which everyone would be reduced to some common denominator. But equality of opportunity.... Now Canada seems to me a land blessed by the gods to pursue a policy of the greatest equality of opportunity. a young country, a rich country, a country with two languages, a pluralist country with its ethnicities and its . . .

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