Culture and Experience

Culture and Experience

Culture and Experience

Culture and Experience

Excerpt

FIRST OF ALL I WISH TO EXPRESS MY APPRECIATION TO THE PHILA- delphia Anthropological Society for promoting the publication of this volume and, in particular, to the officers of the society and members of the Publication Committee who have devoted so much time and thought to it. It was their idea that since many of my papers which dealt with problems on the borderline between anthropology and psychology were scattered about in various periodicals, it might be useful to have them brought together and republished in a single volume.

It was neither desirable nor practical, however, to include all these papers; the major question then was what to select and what to omit and how to organize the articles selected. I did not wish to republish a series of papers arranged in chronological order, unedited and with no central focus. My choice of papers has been highly selective, and the material as it now stands has been organized around a series of problems I have dealt with from time to time, along with relevant data collected in the field. All of the previously published papers chosen for inclusion have been edited and some cutting, to eliminate repetitions, has been done. Besides this, some unpublished material has been added: Chapters 5 and 18, sketching the ethnohistorical background of the Northern Ojibwa (Berens River Saulteaux) and the Lac du Flambeau Ojibwa, specially prepared for this volume; Chapter 9, "Cultural Factors in Spatial Orientation" ; and Chapter 17, the introduction to Part IV on problems in studying the psychological dimension of culture change. In content, the chapters range from those of the most general and theoretical nature to those which embody concrete observations on Ojibwa culture and behavior relevant to the general problems discussed. Except in two instances (Chapters 2 and 19), the titles of previously published articles have been retained.

The title of the volume, Culture and Experience , is intended to suggest an underlying theme which, I believe, will be apparent throughout. For a long time it has seemed to me that, sooner or later, anthropology will have to come to closer grips with a central problem towards which many of its data converge: it should be possible to formulate more explicitly the necessary and sufficient conditions that make a human exis-

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