Fetal Protection in the Workplace: Women's Rights, Business Interests, and the Unborn

Fetal Protection in the Workplace: Women's Rights, Business Interests, and the Unborn

Fetal Protection in the Workplace: Women's Rights, Business Interests, and the Unborn

Fetal Protection in the Workplace: Women's Rights, Business Interests, and the Unborn

Synopsis

-- Joseph Losco, Ball State University

Excerpt

We are in the midst of a revolution in biomedical technology, especially where that technology affects human genetics and reproduction. Rapid advances in prenatal diagnosis and therapy are joined with new reproductive-aiding technologies such as in vitro fertilization and more precise genetic tests. Combined with the burgeoning knowledge of fetal development and the causes of congenital illness, these technologies are altering our perception of the fetus. As a result prevailing values are being challenged by the new biology and the courts are being confronted with novel, onerous cases that require a reevaluation of established legal principles.

One critical set of values undergoing reevaluation centers on the relationship between mother and fetus. The technological removal of the fetus from the "secrecy of the womb" through ultrasound and other prenatal procedures gives the fetus social recognition as an individual separate from the mother. The emergence of in utero surgery (see Harrison et al. 1990) gives the fetus potential patient status, which might at times conflict with that of the pregnant women who carries it. Moreover, conclusive evidence that certain maternal actions during pregnancy such as cocaine (Chasnoff 1988) and alcohol (Wagner 1991) abuse can . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.