Women and Russian Culture: Projections and Self- Perceptions

Women and Russian Culture: Projections and Self- Perceptions

Women and Russian Culture: Projections and Self- Perceptions

Women and Russian Culture: Projections and Self- Perceptions

Synopsis

This collection of essays by leading western and Russian specialists contains new insights and updates previous research into the role of women in Russian culture in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Excerpt

From the origins of modern Russian literature in the eighteenth century until the Revolution of 1917, women have been a source of fascination for Russian writers and critics, many of whom, in the 1840s and 1850s, began to participate in the public discussion of the socalled zhenskii vopros (woman question). In the nineteenth century, articles by such prominent radical critics as Belinsky, Dobroliubov and Pisarev on the portrayal of women characters in literature helped to form the opinion of a large part of the Russian reading public. After the Bolshevik Revolution, however, and particularly after Stalin's rise to power in the late 1920s, public discussion of the representation of women in literature rapidly declined, since rigid gender roles were established by the Soviet regime, and in 1930 the woman question was declared to have been 'resolved'. Whereas in Britain, western Europe and the United States, the new wave of the feminist movement in the 1960s promoted what Elaine Showalter has called 'the feminist critique' -- 'revisionary readings' of masculine texts and criticism -- it was only in the late 1980s that a feminist reinterpretation of Russian literature got seriously under way in the West, with the publication of the pioneering works by Barbara Heldt and Joe Andrew. In the 1990s, major nineteenth-century Russian writers such as Dostoevsky, Pushkin and Turgenev have been reread from a feminist standpoint, although ample scope still remains for further research in this area.

In recent years, influenced by changing trends in feminist criticism as a whole, the attention of western Slavists has begun to shift . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.