Storm and Stampede on the Chisholm

Storm and Stampede on the Chisholm

Storm and Stampede on the Chisholm

Storm and Stampede on the Chisholm

Synopsis

In 1883 young Hubert Collins traveled the Chisholm Trail to a ranch in Indian Territory. For the next fifteen months he lived at the Red Fork Ranch on the banks of the Cimarron River at present-day Dover, Oklahoma. It was the boy's "great land of romance", a dusty empire of cattle and rattlesnakes owned by his older brother, Ralph. With plenty to learn from rangy cowboys in residence and frontier characters passing through, Hubert enjoyed more adventure than he would ever know again. He befriended Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians who stopped by the ranch, and he visited them at the Darlington Agency. In Storm and Stampede on the Chisholm, first published in 1928, he recorded his excitement at being exposed to an elemental way of life soon to be gone.

Excerpt

The growing interest in America's beginnings and especially in its pioneer phase, evidences a deepening sense of historical values. We are getting perspective not only on the lives of our forefathers, but on certain vast movements of men from east to west, and the transformations of landscape which they have effected since the Civil War. Some of us were not only spectators, we were participants in this prodigious drama of settlement. As sons of pioneers we were schooled in the processes of mid-western settlement and its upbuilding.

Mr. Hubert Collins, the author of this book, though born ten years later than I, has seen much more of the actual wild west changes. By a singular, almost unaccountable decision on the part of his father, he passed when a boy of ten from the quiet round of village life in Iowa to his brother's cattle ranch on the bank of a river in Oklahoma territory, and there lived for a year or more surrounded by cow-boys, redmen, bandits and other dramatic and discordant types of the border.

Ten is an impressionable age, as I am able to bear witness, for many of my own books are based on what I saw and felt from my ninth to my thirteenth year, and Hubert Collins shows himself to have been both camera and graphophone. Everything he saw and heard during his stay in Oklahoma, he registered. The fact that ranch life was entirely new to him, rendered him the more sensitive to its every detail. I have no doubt that his boyish inquisitiveness, his wish to see and hear all that went on, was irritating even to the best-natured of his . . .

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