The Troyville Mounds, Catahoula Parish, La

The Troyville Mounds, Catahoula Parish, La

The Troyville Mounds, Catahoula Parish, La

The Troyville Mounds, Catahoula Parish, La

Excerpt

During the summer of 1931, while investigating mounds and burial sites in the Red River Valley in Louisiana, the writer heard of the destruction of a large mound in the eastern part of the State where it was reported that great sheets of cane, pottery, bones, and several kinds of colored clay had been found. Unfortunately, on his arrival it was possible to salvage only fragments of this cane material which lay strewn over the surface of the site where the mound had formerly stood. Further examination, however, indicated that the town of Jonesville itself (fig. 1) occupied the site of an extensive group of mounds surrounded by a low embankment of earth, and the large mound which had been destroyed in the center of the town was also the central one in the group.

Additional research at Washington disclosed the fact that this group at Jonesville was the same one called "Troyville Mounds" pl. 1) by Thomas and other early investigators, and the great mound, which was the one torn down, had been in the unusual shape of a cone surmounting a terraced pyramid and one of the largest mounds in the whole mound area. These considerations led to a determination to revisit the site to see if there were any possibilities for further promising excavation. Accordingly, a few months later when the writer was again in the South he made a more careful investigation of the spot and decided that perhaps the bottom of the great mound had not yet been reached. The weather was unfavorable for continued operations at this season of the year, so that it was not until the fall of 1932 that intensive excavations could be started. Digging was carried on for 2 months, both at the site of the great mound and at several other points in the group, but had to be unexpectedly terminated because of the unsympathetic attitude developed by the owners of the property.

Unfortunately, the people on whose land the great mound had stood were at first suspicious of the intentions of the excavators, . . .

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