American Policy toward Russia since 1917: A Study of Diplomatic History, International Law & Public Opinion

American Policy toward Russia since 1917: A Study of Diplomatic History, International Law & Public Opinion

American Policy toward Russia since 1917: A Study of Diplomatic History, International Law & Public Opinion

American Policy toward Russia since 1917: A Study of Diplomatic History, International Law & Public Opinion

Excerpt

In the present volume an attempt has been made, I think for the first time, to tell with a fair degree of completeness the story of Russian-American relations since the Revolution. The study is based primarily upon American sources, including certain hitherto unpublished diplomatic correspondence in the archives of the Department of State, official documents, books, articles, and miscellaneous newspaper and periodical material. A chronological survey of the development of the American policy from March of 1917 to the time of writing is followed by a detailed analysis and critical evaluation of the grounds upon which diplomatic recognition of the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics is withheld by the Government of the United States. The result is, I hope, not merely a useful treatment of an important phase of diplomatic history but a study of public opinion and of the control of American foreign policy as well.

Since limitations of space make it impossible for me to express my gratitude individually to all those who have so kindly aided me in my work, I must voice my appreciation to them collectively for their valuable assistance in the preparation of the study. Justice requires that I acknowledge my indebtedness specifically, however, to Mr. Tyler Dennett of the Division of Publications of the Department of State for permission to secure access to certain diplomatic correspondence of the intervention period; to Mr. Robert F. Kelley of the Division of Eastern European Affairs for giving me so generously of his time and energy in going through such correspondence; to Mr. E. C. Ropes of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce of the Department of Commerce for customs house statistics on Russian-American trade; to Professor Quincy Wright and Professor Samuel N. Harper of the University of Chicago for their painstaking reading of the original draft of the manuscript and for their invaluable criticisms; to Mr. Arthur Fisher of Chicago for suggestions leading to its publication; and to International Publishers for numerous proposals for additions and revisions which have served to make the book much more accurate and complete than it might otherwise have been.

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