Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson

Excerpt

THE EARLY ENGLISH SETTLERS IN NEW ENGLAND WERE A CAREfully selected group. Their religious tenets, Calvinism in theology and Congregationalism in Church government, were disliked by authority in England to the extent that it was unsafe to profess them; whatever the defects of these tenets, the men who held them in the face of danger were men of moral integrity and intensity; those who risked the desperate venture in New England were even more obviously so. It is not surprising, therefore, to find a certain consistency of character in the New Englanders or to find certain New England strains which produce men of unusual ability with remarkable frequency. The Adamses and Holmeses and Lowells are well-known examples of such families, but if one studies pedigrees one is impressed with many examples likewise of descent through the female line, where the relationships are obscured by changes of name. Ann Bradstreet, for example, may be called the mother of American poetry in more senses than one; and . . .

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