The Christian Renaissance: With Interpretations of Dante, Shakespeare, and Goethe, and a Note on T.S. Eliot

The Christian Renaissance: With Interpretations of Dante, Shakespeare, and Goethe, and a Note on T.S. Eliot

The Christian Renaissance: With Interpretations of Dante, Shakespeare, and Goethe, and a Note on T.S. Eliot

The Christian Renaissance: With Interpretations of Dante, Shakespeare, and Goethe, and a Note on T.S. Eliot

Excerpt

I wish to make clear at the start that my criticisms in this book of post-Renaissance Christianity are wide and general, and directed against no particular sections of belief or practice. I have reason to be very grateful to the editors of Church periodicals of various denominations: and indeed my acknowledgments are here due to The Hibbert Journal and The Canadian Journal of Religious Thought where certain passages in the following pages originally appeared.

Though the ideas in this sort of writing usually come as discoveries, this is partly deceptive. My book thus owes a profound debt to those modern tendencies which are its context. Especially I would name here the writings and general influence of Mr. T. S. Eliot, Mr. Aldous Huxley, and Mr. Middleton Murry: I refer to Mr. Murry's less recent writings. Also these books: Mr. I. G. Bartholomew The Cause of Evil, M. Henri Bergson Creative Evolution, Mr. G. K. Chesterton's The Everlasting Man, William James' The Varieties of Religious Experience, Mr. Max Plowman's study of Blake Prof. Saurat Literature and occult Tradition, Mr. Colin Still Shakespeare's Mystery Play, Canon Streeter Reality, Prof. A. N. Whitehead's Science and the Modern World, and Oscar Wilde De Profundis. I owe certain details to Miss C. F. Spurgeon's work on Shake speare . . .

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