The Concept of Motivation

The Concept of Motivation

The Concept of Motivation

The Concept of Motivation

Excerpt

Whether a given proposition is true or false, significant or meaningless, depends upon what questions it was meant to answer.' R. G. COLLINGWOOD

EVER since Hobbes was fired by the imaginative idea that all human behaviour might be explained in terms of mechanical principles, there have been sporadic attempts to provide over-all theories of human behaviour. Such theories have been instigated more by the desire to develop an ambitious theory than by puzzlement about concrete problems of human behaviour. This was true of Hobbes who pictured himself doing for psychology what Harvey had done for physiology by extending the new science of motion to the most intimate spheres of human thought and endeavour. It was also true of later theorists who, under the influence of Darwin rather than of Galileo, were excited by the thought that men were animals as well as mere bodies. McDougall, for instance, did not provide any startling answers to concrete questions about human behaviour; rather he concocted a sort of dynamic atomism to show that . . .

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