Architectural Guide for Connecticut

Architectural Guide for Connecticut

Architectural Guide for Connecticut

Architectural Guide for Connecticut

Excerpt

The earliest attempts at colonization within the present political limits of Connecticut resulted in several independent settlements. Grouped around New Haven-- then Quinnipiac--there were the tidewater towns of Milford, Branford, and Guilford, while inland, along the Connecticut River, there were the so-called "river towns" of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield. Saybrook, at the river's mouth, made a third, and New London a fourth more or less independent colony.

While the architecture of these isolated settlements varied in character, the differences that existed were not as sharply marked as might be expected. They were, in fact, mainly those of detail, arising from the various traditional methods of construction that the early builders had brought with them from different parts of England. But though these differences--such, for example, as various ways of framing--existed among the settlements, one typical plan sufficed for all. While these constructive preferences were passed on for a time in different localities from master to apprentice, eventually such differences became less, and a fairly general uniformity characterized the work of the Connecticut builders.

But while it is true that uniformity of type came into being during the early days of the commonwealth, and continued through and even beyond the Colonial period, it must not be supposed that all of Connecticut's houses fell within certain classifications. Indeed, it is but necessary to remember that the settlers were men of different social stations, and possessed of varying degrees of wealth, to realize why these factors, as might be expected, duly found architectural expression. Although they come within no type classification, such as we are about to discuss, it may be of interest to give brief consideration to a few of . . .

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