The Materials of Medieval Painting

The Materials of Medieval Painting

The Materials of Medieval Painting

The Materials of Medieval Painting

Excerpt

Possum ergo sane redargui quia ad talia vacco scilicet scribendo puerilia seu inutilia. . . .--Anonymus Bernensis, saec. XI

Where do you suppose he got those colours? I think he evolved them out of his Inner Consciousness.--Dear Old Lady to a young copyist in the National Gallery, A.D. 1922

THIS volume is designed for those who care for what my dearest enemy calls "the cookery of art," for those who wonder about the natures and the sources of the materials out of which painters in the Middle Ages compounded objects that we still cherish. I have developed elsewhere the thesis that style and technique are inseparable, and this inquiry into cookery, this sojourn in the kitchen, would be unwarranted if it did not lead to some slightly more keen or intelligent appreciation of the finished dishes. "'Style and technique are inseparable,'" writes my learned friend M. Henri Focillon: "Voilá la vérité, que méconnaissent seuls ceux qui travaillent du dehors."

The functions of technique in the development of styles of architecture have long been recognized. The technical bases of design and ornament in pottery, glass, textiles, and metalwork are regularly seen in something like their true perspective. The late Dr. Josef Meder of Vienna brought great judgment and penetration to the unit study of technique and style in drawings; and the considerations of material and manipulation which affected the evolution of style in early woodcuts have been set forth brilliantly and . . .

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