Papers of Edward P. Costigan: Relating to the Progressive Movement in Colorado, 1902-1917

Papers of Edward P. Costigan: Relating to the Progressive Movement in Colorado, 1902-1917

Papers of Edward P. Costigan: Relating to the Progressive Movement in Colorado, 1902-1917

Papers of Edward P. Costigan: Relating to the Progressive Movement in Colorado, 1902-1917

Excerpt

The papers contained in this volume have been taken in the main from the Costigan Collection, which was presented to the University of Colorado by Senator Edward P. Costigan's widow, Mrs. Mabel Cory Costigan, in 1939. Not many of these documents have been printed hitherto; some of them, here reprinted, were in ephemeral form; a few of them, especially the excerpts from newspapers, have been included in order to make the record more complete.

This volume is built around Mr. Costigan's part in the Progressive movement in Colorado up to 1917, the year of his appointment to the United States Tariff Commission. This limitation in time and subject matter has been made partly to secure greater unity and partly to avoid, so far as possible, the duplication of material in Public Ownership of Government: Collected Papers of Edward P. Costigan, a volume issued in 1940 as a memorial to Senator Costigan by a group of his friends. It is hoped also that there may be a second volume of Costigan papers in the University of Colorado Historical Collections--one based on his career on the Tariff Commission and in the United States Senate.

In the present book the documents have been chosen primarily to set forth Mr. Costigan's social and political principles and incidentally to describe and illustrate the Progressive movement in Colorado. Ardent by nature and a zealous champion of any cause to which he gave his allegiance, Edward P. Costigan stood for years in the center of spirited political combats and social struggles, and traded some hard blows with his opponents. In the choice of documents to be printed in this volume an effort has been made to present, on the one hand, the vital issues in those conflicts and something of their spirit; but, on the other, to minimize the personal elements in the struggles. It should be remembered that in the heat of political controversy statements may be made or names called that one would not care to set in a permanent record, even though he believed them to be true, years or even months later.

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