Coronado's Children: Tales of Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest

Coronado's Children: Tales of Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest

Coronado's Children: Tales of Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest

Coronado's Children: Tales of Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest

Excerpt

O brave new world That has such people in't!-- The Tempest .

WHAT the Golden Fleece was to the Greeks or what El Dorado--the Gilded Man--has been to South America, the lost mines on the San Saba and Llano rivers in Texas have been to all that part of the United States once owned by Spain. The story of these mines is a cycle made up of a thousand cantos. Housed mechanics, preachers, teachers, doctors, lawyers, earth-treading farmers and home-staying women, as well as roaming cowboys, rangers, outlaws and miners, have told the strange story--and believed it. It is a story of yesterday, as obsolete as the claiming of continents by priority in flag-hoisting; it is a story of today, as realistic as the salt of the earth; it is also a story of tomorrow, as fantastic and romantic as the hopes of man. Through it history walks unabashed and in it fancy sets no limit to extravagance.

Sometimes the name of the fabled source of wealth is Los Almagres; sometimes, Las Amarillas; again, La Mina de las Iguanas, or Lizard Mine, from the fact that the ore is said to have been found in chunks called iguanas (lizards); oftener the name is simply the Lost San Saba Mine or the Lost Bowie Mine. In seeking it, generations of men have disemboweled mountains, drained lakes, and turned rivers out of their courses. It has been found--and lost--in many places under many conditions. It is here; it is there; it is nowhere. Generally it is silver; sometimes it is gold. Sometimes it is in a cave; some-

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