Selected Articles on Intervention in Latin America - Vol. 5

Selected Articles on Intervention in Latin America - Vol. 5

Selected Articles on Intervention in Latin America - Vol. 5

Selected Articles on Intervention in Latin America - Vol. 5

Excerpt

There have been few public questions in this country which have received more attention in the past few years than the policy of intervening in the affairs of the Latin- American countries. No governmental policy in the past decade or two has been more generally or more bitterly attacked, and none has been more consistently or more persistently followed by both political parties. Professor John H. Latané, in testifying before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs on January 12, 1927, said that the number of cases of intervention by the United States in the affairs of some other country probably runs up to a hundred. Particularly in the smaller countries of the Caribbean has the United States often intervened, controlling the affairs of the country by the force of American arms, sometimes continuing such control for a considerable number of years.

There is scarcely another great public question on which the people of this country have formed their opinions and reached their conclusions on the basis of so little definite information, on which so large a part of our own people are so ill-informed. On the right and the wrong of the policy of intervention, on its benefits and its harm to this country and to Latin America, on the question of whether it insures or endangers the peace of the world, on the present status and the future scope of the Monroe Doctrine, on the operations and business transactions of American bankers, oil magnates, and concession hunters in the less advanced Latin-American nations of the tropics, on the ability of some of the smaller nations of the tropics to govern themselves, the possibility of democratic institutions modeled on those of the United States forming the basis of a permanent and satisfactory government in the smaller countries of the tropics that have so large a percentage of illiteracy and so small a percentage of Caucasian people, there is urgent need of more general knowledge in this country, of educating the American people to the facts and eliminating the harmful effects of insidious and selfish propaganda.

LAMAR T. BEMAN.

March 1, 1928.

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