Vanishing Farm Markets and Our World Trade

Vanishing Farm Markets and Our World Trade

Vanishing Farm Markets and Our World Trade

Vanishing Farm Markets and Our World Trade

Excerpt

DISBURSEMENTS in rental and benefit payments made by the federal government to farmers participating in adjustment programs totaled over $630,000,000 April 1, 1935. Taken by commodities these payments were: corn-hogs, $223,000,000; cotton, $221,000,000; wheat, $159,000,000; tobacco, $24,000,000; and sugar, $3,000,000.

CORN-HOG CHECKS

In 1934, over a million corn-hog farmers signed a contract with the Secretary of Agriculture. These farmers agreed to curtail their corn acreage and hog numbers. This they did. They cut their corn from 55,000,000, to 41,400,000 acres and their hogs from 54,000,000 to 40,500,000 head. To compensate them for making these reductions, the Secretary promised to pay them about $320,000,000.

As a result of the reduction program and drought, supplies of both corn and hogs are (April, 1935) unusually low. Corn prices are high--80 to 90 cents a bushel on farms. Hogs, too, are better in price than they have been in years. Nevertheless, another corn- hog program is launched. The benefit payments to be made by the Secretary for the 1935 reduction are greatly reduced. But in spite of the smaller corn-hog checks promised by the Secretary . . .

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