Modern Government in a Colonial City: A Survey of the City Government and Finances of Williamsburg, Virginia

Modern Government in a Colonial City: A Survey of the City Government and Finances of Williamsburg, Virginia

Modern Government in a Colonial City: A Survey of the City Government and Finances of Williamsburg, Virginia

Modern Government in a Colonial City: A Survey of the City Government and Finances of Williamsburg, Virginia

Excerpt

The restoration of Williamsburg as the embodiment and symbol of our colonial heritage makes it impossible to continue there the small-town government that has come down through the generations. This truth is recognized by the city government, the city's representatives in the state legislature, and the governor of Virginia. Early in 1930 three important steps were taken to meet the situation. A new city charter was drafted as a basis for discussion, combining and clarifying the various laws dealing with the powers and organization of the city; a full time city engineer was appointed, and the Institute of Public Administration of New York City was asked to make a thorough study of the organization and finances of the city to serve as a guide to the Mayor and Council in dealing with the city's problems.

This survey of the city government was undertaken by the Institute in March and completed in June, 1930. The staff engaged in the field study and preparation of the report was composed of Dr. Carl E. McCombs, Harrington Place (of the Detroit Bureau of Governmental Research), A. E. Buck, A. M. Landman, Hubert W. Stone, Morton D. Weiss, Audrey M. Davies, Koichi Hasegawa, and the undersigned, as director.

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