Currents in Biochemical Research, 1956: Twenty-Seven Essays Charting the Present Course of Biochemical Research and Considering the Intimate Relationship of Biochemistry to Medicine, Physiology, and Biology

Currents in Biochemical Research, 1956: Twenty-Seven Essays Charting the Present Course of Biochemical Research and Considering the Intimate Relationship of Biochemistry to Medicine, Physiology, and Biology

Currents in Biochemical Research, 1956: Twenty-Seven Essays Charting the Present Course of Biochemical Research and Considering the Intimate Relationship of Biochemistry to Medicine, Physiology, and Biology

Currents in Biochemical Research, 1956: Twenty-Seven Essays Charting the Present Course of Biochemical Research and Considering the Intimate Relationship of Biochemistry to Medicine, Physiology, and Biology

Excerpt

Ten years ago the first volume of Currents in Biochemical Research made its debut. The cordial reception which was given this volume by biologists, chemists, biochemists, and clinicians indicated clearly that at appropriate intervals there exists a real need to pause and reflect on what has been accomplished, to distinguish between tree and forest, to learn the lessons of the years which have passed, and to prepare intellectually for the years to come. Once again a distinguished group of twenty-seven contributors has been invited to make a decennial survey of progress in most, although by no means all, important fields of biochemical research. They have been asked to write as simply and as lucidly as the requirements of scholarship permit. The objectives of these essays have been to communicate to nonspecialists an overall impression of the present status of the significant problems in each field, to point up the broad strategy of current research, and finally, to speculate on the likely paths of future research. Above all, the essays were intended to bring light without overwhelming the reader with tedious detail. It would be too much to expect that each of the twenty-seven essays has met all these exacting stipulations, but at least I have high hopes that enough of them come sufficiently close to justify the aims of this second volume.

The past decade has witnessed a rate of progress vastly greater than in any comparable period since the early beginnings of biochemistry as a science more than 100 years ago. There is little doubt that this phenomenal rate of development has been sparked by a revolution in methodology. The emergence of filter paper chromatography as a tool for separating minute . . .

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