Currents and Eddies in the English Romantic Generation

Currents and Eddies in the English Romantic Generation

Currents and Eddies in the English Romantic Generation

Currents and Eddies in the English Romantic Generation

Excerpt

If literary history is exclusively the interpretation of great literature, it should confine itself to masters and masterpieces. But if it be also a lesson from past ages for our own, it must interpret those minor figures who, more than the giants, because they are more numerous and pliant, form the thought currents of the day. And if, further, history be a panorama of the human drama called life, who would reject entirely the comedy of the vain poetaster or the tragedy of the broken minor who was, the great poet who might have been? We make no pretence of having allotted space to each author in exact proportion to his literary merits, and we know that we have mentioned several people whom it is better to read about than to read. But it was only by this means, we thought, that we could present a brilliant transitional age in its habit as it lived. If we have said more about the environment of poets than about the magic qualities of their verse, it is because the latter task has already been so well done by Professor Beers, Professor Elton, Mr. Arthur Symons, and others. May this book throw a little light on those ill-understood forces at work in life, some for the encouragement -- too many for the destruction -- of incipient poetry.

F. E. P.

August, 1918.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.