The Confederation of Europe: A Study of the European Alliance, 1813-1823, as an Experiment in the International Organization of Peace

The Confederation of Europe: A Study of the European Alliance, 1813-1823, as an Experiment in the International Organization of Peace

The Confederation of Europe: A Study of the European Alliance, 1813-1823, as an Experiment in the International Organization of Peace

The Confederation of Europe: A Study of the European Alliance, 1813-1823, as an Experiment in the International Organization of Peace

Excerpt

The lectures here reproduced were delivered at Oxford during Trinity Term of 1913. Though included among the courses falling under the Faculty of History, their object and scope, as I explain more fully in the introductory lecture, are not purely historical. Their intention is, briefly, to illustrate from a particular period of history the problems involved in the practical application of the principles of International Law, and my hope is that they may serve a useful purpose in helping to create a sound opinion upon questions which are too often discussed from a standpoint wholly out of touch with the realities of life. Apart from the modern movement for the organization of peace, there is another question, of even greater practical importance, upon which the study of the experiment in international government during the period under review throws no little light. This is the question, or series of questions, involved in recent developments of the Monroe Doctrine, about which so much is now being heard in connexion with the relations of the United States with the Republics of Latin America. The doctrine, inspired by Canning, formulated by John Quincy Adams, and embodied by President Monroe in his famous Message to Congress in 1823, was originally a . . .

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