The Glass of Fashion: Some Social Reflections

The Glass of Fashion: Some Social Reflections

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The Glass of Fashion: Some Social Reflections

The Glass of Fashion: Some Social Reflections

Read FREE!

Excerpt

With no disrespect to the House of Lords, I consider there is no position higher than that of an English country gentleman.--PEMBERTON MILNES.

The grave moralist concerns himself with evils so flagrant that no one is in any doubt as to their nature. He is the policeman of society, keeping his eye on the burglar, the publican, and the prostitute. The satirist and the comic artist, on the other hand, are concerned with such matters as fashion and manners, matters which seem beneath the notice of the grave moralist, but which nevertheless exercise a more potent influence on society than the teaching of philosophers, the programmes of political reformers, and the machinations of the criminal classes.

Folly, not vice, is the enemy. Our curse is not original sin but aboriginal stupidity. It is human to err, inhuman to practise iniquity. We blunder rather than. sin. Few men set out to reach hell, but most of us are for ever losing our way to heaven.

Folly, as an aberration, is laughable; as a fashion, as a rule of life, it is disastrous.

The object of this book is to convince people of two . . .

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