Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright

Excerpt

In his London lectures of 1939, Frank Lloyd Wright said: "Every great architect is --necessarily--a great poet. He must be a great original interpreter of his time, his day, his age."1 Wright himself was exactly this, as he well knew when he said it. The prose of architecture--the background buildings which attempt only a little and are content to serve as neutral settings for any kind of human thought and action--did not interest him. Instead, it was his life-long intention to form human life into rhythmic patterns which seemed to him poetic and to embody those patterns in buildings which were in every case specific and unique poetic works themselves. In this double need he was the child of his time, but his extraordinary ability to carry his intentions through made him in fact its "great original interpreter."

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