Africa's Challenge to America

Africa's Challenge to America

Africa's Challenge to America

Africa's Challenge to America

Excerpt

In the first phase of our foreign policy after World War II, as we found ourselves driven more and more into major responsibility for the affairs of the free world, our attention was concentrated on what became known as the NATO area. Our problem here was to prepare our defenses against our former ally, Russia, which, as soon as the fighting of World War II was over, renewed its efforts to conquer the world.

The problem of the defense of Western society was made easier by our common heritage and by our equally common determination that we did not intend to be conquered by Russia. Wise measures prepared the groundwork for the pooling of our defenses against the Russians. The Marshall Plan restored the economic strength of war-battered Europe; the North Atlantic Treaty provided the juridical basis for the common defense; and then the North Atlantic Defense Force gave us the military means of making clear to Russia that we did not intend to be defeated or overawed by the massive Red Army and the growing Russian air-atomic power.

The United States worked well with its partners of Western society in developing a common front of economic well-being and self-defense in the NATO area. But . . .

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